Friday, July 7, 2017

Sepia Saturday: Swimming in the '20s

Swimming in the 1920s, probably at Kow Swamp.
This week's photo is in a family album but I don't know who the people are. I think it was taken at Kow Swamp in the 1920s.

Kow Swamp is a shallow freshwater lake in northern Victoria near Gunbower now used for water storage and some recreational activities such as fishing and birdwatching. It is also a significant archaeological site of Aboriginal heritage and history.

You can find more responses over at Sepia Saturday.


Saturday, July 1, 2017

Sepia Saturday: McKinnon's farm, Homerton

In 1952 my parents moved from a wheat farm in the Wimmera to a dairy farm at Homerton on the south coast of Victoria. I was three years old and my younger brother just one.

Our parents owned the farm for about 35 years so I grew up there and have many happy memories of the farm and the district.

Just a few years ago I met a lady by chance who, as a child, was friends with the girl in the first photo below, Heather McKinnon. The McKinnons had owned our farm before us and I was delighted when Heather gave me some copies of old photographs she had of the farm.

It's been interesting to compare what the farm looked like in the 1930s and as I remember it from the 1950s. Some of the buildings were still there, some not. Dad used a tractor rather than horses. Even the trees and vegetation in the background are interesting.

The three photos below were taken on different occasions so I think the cream cart must have been used to entertain visitors as well as their real purpose of taking the cream cans to the end of the lane for pickup and probably for carting other items around the farm as well. Heather was an only child so I imagine she was very skilled with horses and other farm work.
 
Heather McKinnon with her dogs on the horse-drawn cream sled.

Visitors with the dogs on the cream sled.
When we bought the farm we moved into the McKinnon's home (in the photo below) but it was quite old and we only lived there for about three years before my parents built a new house. Some of the garden trees still exist but the house in this photo is long gone.
Visiting children on the cream sled.
This post has been in response to Sepia Saturday's theme photo of dogs. You can see other responses here.


Sunday, April 9, 2017

London School of Music

At a recent family gathering a relative turned up with a photo I hadn't seen before. It was my husband's grandmother, Mary Leed.

Mary Leed, 1922
Mary is wearing a graduation gown and hat and holding a rolled-up certificate. The photo prompted me to search on Trove and I found a relevant article. It informs me that Mary was awarded the Diploma of Associate (A.L.C.M.) for Singing.

Mary Leed, The Argus 18 June 1922
ALCM means Associate London College of Music and Mary was entitled to put those initials after her name (ie Mary I Leed ALCM). It meant that she had studied singing for many years, moving through each of the eight grades and then the Diploma which is equivalent to a second-year university degree. She was, indeed, a very fine singer and entertained at concerts in northern Victoria.

The LCM exams started in London 1887 and were very popular in Australia. Students studied musical performance and theory and examinations were held twice a year.

Advertisement for London College of Music, The Advocate 26 May 1921
Mary grew up on a farm in Central Molga near Pyramid Hill, went to school locally and then attended Methodist Ladies College in Melbourne for a year. She married a local farmer, Ralph Alford, in September 1922 - the year the graduation photo was taken.

A generation later Mary's daughter, Shirley Alford, was awarded a Licentiate of the London College of Music, an LLCM, for piano. That award is equivalent to a final-year university module. She taught piano for many years and played the organ at church. She also supported local Eisteddfod sompetitions.

Shirley Alford, LLCM c1947
The London School of Music is still very active and is now incorporated into the University of West London.

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Sepia Saturday: A trio of damaged photographs

The theme photo for Sepia Saturday this week is shows a print from a glass plate negative of three choir boys. I don't have any family photos to match so I've chosen a trio of damaged photos of trios.

These three photos are in the collection of the Genealogical Society of Victoria. They appear to be prints from damaged glass negatives. Most seem to be taken in a Melbourne studio in the 1920s, very few have names but the quality (of the undamaged bits) is very good. The photographer is unknown.




You can see more contributions to the theme over at Sepia Saturday's webpage. And you can see the rest of the collection on GSV's Flickr page here and here.